Early this year, Rihanna was recognized for her work with the Clara Lionel Foundation and for donating money to star a breast cancer treatment center in Barbados at Havard – During her touching speech, Rihanna said, “I would think to myself, ‘I wonder how many 25 cents I could save up to save all the kids in Africa.’ And I would say to myself, ‘When I grow up, and I can get rich, I’m gonna save kids all over the world.’ I just didn’t know I would be in the position to do that by the time I was a teenager,” Rihanna said. “What the little girl watching those commercials didn’t know is that you don’t have to be rich to be a humanitarian. You don’t have to be rich to help somebody.”

In this short documentary, 14-year-old aspiring businessman Wongani Nyirenda describes life of a student in Muzu primary school, and the impact of a lack of resources has on children like him. We see Rihanna meeting with government officials and teaching math to a classroom, helping students work on difficult problems and cheering on students during a rugby game. 
Rihanna's trip to Malawi is shown in the documentary and follows her as she visits schools and speaks with community members about education and health. 
I love that they learn in melody," Rihanna says about the students. "That's like my favorite thing because kids, they adopt melody really, really quickly. And so if you can use that as a learning tool, I think that's the most brilliant, brilliant thing."