Michael Jordan didn't travel the easiest of roads en route to becoming a college basketball star and an NBA legend.
And certain obstacles put a chip on his shoulder that, while it long since seems to have vanished, helped shape the athlete's drive and competitive spirit moving forward, according to "Michael Jordan: The Life," a new biography about the six-time NBA champion by sportswriter Roland Lazenby that hit shelves Tuesday.
Per an excerpt from the book, Jordan told Lazenby that he was suspended from school in 1977 after throwing a soda at a girl who called him the N-word.

Michael Jordan plays for the Chicago Bulls against the Miami Heat on November 6, 1996.
 
"So I threw a soda at her," Jordan's quoted as saying. "I was really rebelling. I considered myself a racist at the time. Basically, I was against all white people."
Lazenby told Sports Illustrated that it appeared that the root of Jordan's animosity came from growing up in an area of North Carolina where the Ku Klux Klan once had a large presence.